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Learning resources from INTO UEA

Introducing the topic

At the beginning of a lecture the lecturer will normally tell you what they are going to talk about.

Phrases they could use include:

  • today’s topic/lecture
  • do/talk about today

  • But what I want to do today is talk some more about what determines the shapes of supply and demand curves.
  • What we’re going to do today is begin with an informal discussion looking at some of Paolo’s work over the years at Goldman.
  • And that will be the focus of today’s lecture.
  • So let’s get to today’s topic. we’re going to finish talking about valence bond theory and hybridization.
  • And so today we’re going to turn to the second part of the problem, which is talking about budget constraints.
  • And one of the key reactions we’ll talk about today is the conversion of NADP.
  • What we’re talking about in this lecture is cloning a piece of DNA.
  • OK, this is lecture eight in linear algebra, and this is the lecture where we completely solve linear equations.
  • Okay. This lecture is mostly about the idea of similar matrixes.
  • Open quiz in new tab

    Watch the video, complete the gaps on a piece of paper, then check your answers.

    1. This lecture will be a some slightly shorter lecture than usual. What I first want to do is finish off the
      discussion
      of clinical psychology from last lecture and then have a little brief
      discussion
      about some very interesting
      research
      on happiness.
    2. And, as I mentioned, we left off and as we started back here to
      describe
      the atom and how the atom holds together the nucleus and the electron using classical mechanics. And today we’ll finish that discussion, and, of course, point out actually the
      failure
      of classical mechanics to appropriately
      describe
      what’s going on in an atom.
    3. The
      main
      topic today is what is a derivative.
    4. So we’re shifting
      gears
      today. we’re going to talk about molecular evolution, i.e., how do we understand how
      species
      evolve, how do we understand a lot about ourselves, how human evolution is taking place over the last couple hundred thousand years.
    5. So I think that this particular lecture, which will talk about the
      varied
      nature of Roman architecture, especially architecture commissioned by
      individual
      patrons to preserve their memory for posterity, again is
      particularly
      appropriate. I’ve called today’s lecture "Accessing Afterlife: Tombs of Roman Aristocrats, Freedmen, and Slaves”.
    6. But here I brought in David Swensen, who is claimed to have beaten the market
      consistently
      since 1985, and
      dramatically
      . And so, what do we make of that? That’s the subject of today’s lecture.
    7. Now, so what we’re going to do today is I will show you how to calculate those Fourier series. I will not be able to use it to actually
      solve
      any differential equation. It will take us pretty much all the period to show how to calculate a Fourier series.
    8. There’s four valves that are important and they guard the entrances. One of the
      key
      things we’re going to talk about today is the function of these valves in
      producing
      a flow.
    9. Today we are going to do some algorithms, back to algorithms, and we are going to use a lot of the, well, some of the
      simpler
      mathematics that we
      developed
      last class like the master theorem for solving recurrences. We are going to use this a lot. Because we are going to talk about recursive algorithms today.
    10. Today we’re going to hear more about the more obvious
      negative
      manifestations of white reaction to this New Negro mentality.

    1. This lecture will be a some slightly shorter lecture than usual. What I first want to do is finish off the discussion of clinical psychology from last lecture and then have a little brief discussion about some very interesting research on happiness.
    2. And, as I mentioned, we left off and as we started back here to describe the atom and how the atom holds together the nucleus and the electron using classical mechanics. And today we’ll finish that discussion, and, of course, point out actually the failure of classical mechanics to appropriately describe what’s going on in an atom.
    3. The main topic today is what is a derivative.
    4. So we’re shifting gears today. we’re going to talk about molecular evolution, i.e., how do we understand how species evolve, how do we understand a lot about ourselves, how human evolution is taking place over the last couple hundred thousand years.
    5. So I think that this particular lecture, which will talk about the varied nature of Roman architecture, especially architecture commissioned by individual patrons to preserve their memory for posterity, again is particularly appropriate. I’ve called today’s lecture "Accessing Afterlife: Tombs of Roman Aristocrats, Freedmen, and Slaves”.
    6. But here I brought in David Swensen, who is claimed to have beaten the market consistently since 1985, and dramatically. And so, what do we make of that? That’s the subject of today’s lecture.
    7. Now, so what we’re going to do today is I will show you how to calculate those Fourier series. I will not be able to use it to actually solve any differential equation. It will take us pretty much all the period to show how to calculate a Fourier series.
    8. There’s four valves that are important and they guard the entrances. One of the key things we’re going to talk about today is the function of these valves in producing a flow.
    9. Today we are going to do some algorithms, back to algorithms, and we are going to use a lot of the, well, some of the simpler mathematics that we developed last class like the master theorem for solving recurrences. We are going to use this a lot. Because we are going to talk about recursive algorithms today.
    10. Today we’re going to hear more about the more obvious negative manifestations of white reaction to this New Negro mentality.

    • Catherine Drennan and Elizabeth Vogel Taylor, 5.111 Principles of Chemical Science,Fall 2008 (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), https://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    • Claudette Gardel, Eric Lander, Robert Weinberg and Andrew Chess, 7.012 Introduction to Biology,Fall 2004 (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), https://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    • David Jerison, 18.01 Single Variable Calculus,Fall 2006 (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), https://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    • Charles Leiserson and Erik Demaine, Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503), Fall 2005 (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), https://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    • Haynes Miller and Arthur Mattuck, 18.03 Differential Equations, Spring 2010 (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), https://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    • Paul Bloom, Introduction to Psychology (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), https://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA. Terms of Use
    • Jonathan Holloway, African American History: From Emancipation to the Present (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), https://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA. Terms of Use
    • Diana E. E. Kleiner, Roman Architecture (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), https://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA. Terms of Use
    • W. Mark Saltzman, Frontiers of Biomedical Engineering (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), https://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA. Terms of Use
    • Robert J. Shiller, Financial Markets (2011) (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), https://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed 6 June 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA. Terms of Use