Introduction


Lecturers may draw your attention to diagrams, tables, etc.

The words used could include:

  • look at this chart/diagram/figure/graph/map/picture/plan
  • this figure (etc.) shows/illustrates/represents
  • shown/illustrated/represented in/by this diagram (etc.)
  • parts of a diagram: e.g. arrow, box, area, curve, axis, column, row

See also the graph quiz.

Examples

  • Another way to understand it is to look at this diagram.
  • If you look at your handout, table one, that breaks down the crimes dealt with by various court jurisdictions in the counties I’ve marked on the map here.
  • You’ll find the estimates there in section eight of your table.
  • Figure 24-4  shows the structure of the Earned Income Tax Credit.
  • What this slide shows you is some of the designs that have been tested over time.
  • What’s shown in this diagram is the progress of the developing embryo as it travels in time, down the fallopian tube.
  • But that value is smaller than along z, as illustrated by this graph over here.
  • And the central problem represented by this map is that certain kinds of resources, such as wolves or grizzly bears or complexes of species, transcend these jurisdictional boundaries.
  • OK, the next series of slides are just to illustrate in one ecosystem the importance of the biota and maintaining nitrogen in the ecosystem.
  • This first arrow here represents the filtrate that’s produced in the glomerulus of this particular nephron.
  • I’m going to draw graphs. We’ll let the x-axis represent time. And the y-axis represents how good or bad your life is at that time.
  • And now what can go in the second column of this orthogonal matrix?
  • This is the famous bell-shaped curve that was discovered by the mathematician Gauss over a hundred years ago.

Exercise

  • Watch the video.
  • Identify the visual aids referred to in each clip. For example, image.
  • Sometimes a particular part of a visual aid could be mentioned, such as line or row.
  • Also listen out for the word handout.
  1. graphfigurehandout
  2. vertical axis
  3. diagram
  4. picturecurve
  5. slide
  6. chart
  7. table(s)handoutcolumns
  8. handoutmap

Gap fill


Watch the video and complete the gaps.

  1. So to review, let’s go to our basic supply and demand graph, Figure 2-1 in the handout. You talked in section about the market for pork.
  2. OK, with a price of P1. There’s a bit of mislabelling here. On the vertical axis, that upper price should be P2. So on the vertical axis, you see there’s P1 equals P. Then above it, it says P1 again. That should say P2.
  3. When the mitral valve closes, the aortic valve is already closed, that means the ventricle is sealed off. That’s what I showed you in the diagram here right after atrial systole. Both valves are closed and the ventricle is contracting.
  4. This is just another picture of the cardiac cycle where now I’ve sort of combined everything together. You can see this pressure curve here, the pressure curve for the aorta, for the ventricle, for the atrium, and you can visually correlate that with what’s happening in each event.
  5. And I think about this as a problem of being on the horns of a quad-lemma. And after I put this slide together, I was on my way to lecture this morning, I was saying to myself it’s not really a quad-lemma, the analogy being a dilemma. It really has many more dimensions to it.
  6. There were previous production credits back in 1999 and 2001 and 2003. And then they expired at the end of those years. So that if you can see this chart, you can see the rather dramatic decline in the populations taking advantage of these credits.
  7. And some of the figures that have been produced are there on one of the tables on your handout. If you look at table two, it’s worth looking at in detail but if you just look at the last two columns there you have a rate calculated per hundred thousand population for the counties of Surrey and Sussex.
  8. Basically, each manor was divided into what was described as the demesne land and what was tenant land. If you look at your handout, there’s a map there of the manor of Laxton in Nottinghamshire. That’s almost right in the centre of England.

Transcript

  1. So to review, let’s go to our basic supply and demand graph, Figure 2-1 in the handout. You talked in section about the market for pork.
  2. OK, with a price of P1. There’s a bit of mislabelling here. On the vertical axis, that upper price should be P2. So on the vertical axis, you see there’s P1 equals P. Then above it, it says P1 again. That should say P2.
  3. When the mitral valve closes, the aortic valve is already closed, that means the ventricle is sealed off. That’s what I showed you in the diagram here right after atrial systole. Both valves are closed and the ventricle is contracting.
  4. This is just another picture of the cardiac cycle where now I’ve sort of combined everything together. You can see this pressure curve here, the pressure curve for the aorta, for the ventricle, for the atrium, and you can visually correlate that with what’s happening in each event.
  5. And I think about this as a problem of being on the horns of a quad-lemma. And after I put this slide together, I was on my way to lecture this morning, I was saying to myself it’s not really a quad-lemma, the analogy being a dilemma. It really has many more dimensions to it.
  6. There were previous production credits back in 1999 and 2001 and 2003. And then they expired at the end of those years. So that if you can see this chart, you can see the rather dramatic decline in the populations taking advantage of these credits.
  7. And some of the figures that have been produced are there on one of the tables on your handout. If you look at table two, it’s worth looking at in detail but if you just look at the last two columns there you have a rate calculated per hundred thousand population for the counties of Surrey and Sussex.
  8. Basically, each manor was divided into what was described as the demesne land and what was tenant land. If you look at your handout, there’s a map there of the manor of Laxton in Nottinghamshire. That’s almost right in the centre of England.

Video sources

  • Jonathan Gruber, Principles of Microeconomics, Fall 2011 (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), http://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 31 May, 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
  • W. Mark Saltzman, Frontiers of Biomedical Engineering (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), http://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed May 31, 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA. Terms of Use
  • John Wargo, Environmental Politics and Law (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), http://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed May 31, 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA. Terms of Use
  • Keith E. Wrightson, Early Modern England: Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), http://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed May 31, 2013). Licence: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA. Terms of Use