First Assignment advice

Site front page

UEA Library and the Learning Enhancement Team have made a website called UEA Your First Assignment and Beyond. So far it consists of: Finding and using information Types of information Finding your sources Reading effectively Evaluating your sources Managing your information Writing your assignment Planning your assignment Using sources in your assignment Drafting your assignment

PressReader

PressReader on phone

Join Norfolk Libraries and you can read magazines and newspapers online in various languages, via PressReader. Norfolk library staff will be in UEA Library tomorrow (Tuesday 8th October) to help you: @uniofeastanglia students, want to read 1,000's of worldwide newspapers & magazines for free? On Tuesday 10 – 2 @NorfolkLibs staff will be in @UEALibrary… Read more PressReader

Science Weekly podcasts

Guardian science logo

The Guardian’s Science Weekly podcasts have been broadcast from 2006 to the present. For example, earlier this month a podcast discussed finding life on other planets. You can listen to the podcasts on the Guardian website, or on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or Spotify. They can also be downloaded as MP3 files.

Dummies and Complete Idiots

O'Reilly screenshot

The O’Reilly collection has a large number of ebooks in both the For Dummies and the (Complete) Idiot’s Guide series. Titles in the For Dummies series include: Statistics Financial Accounting Starting a Business English Grammar Office 365 Brexit The (Complete) Idiot’s Guides include: Psychology Economics Grammar and Style Business Law Starting and Running a Restaurant

Tatoeba

Website screenshot

Tatoeba is a database of sentences and translations. Enter a phrase and it shows example sentences in several languages. For example, a search for get drunk finds 95 English sentences, such as: Let’s get drunk. Don’t get drunk. Tom is getting drunk. I never get drunk. Getting drunk won’t make things better. Sentences come with… Read more Tatoeba

Shtooka

Shtooka website banner

The Shtooka Project is a collection of sound recordings of words and sentences in several languages. For example, here is the English word university:   Recordings can be downloaded in various formats. They are used in Wiktionary. They are also being used for our own minimal pair pronunciation quizzes.

Lexico

Lexico front page

Oxford’s online English dictionary has moved to Lexico.com. Besides the dictionary and thesaurus, there are sections on grammar, spelling, writing, punctuation, word origins, etc. For example, do you know the longest one-syllable English words? There are several that have nine letters: screeched /skriːʧt/ schlepped /ʃlɛpt/ scratched /skræʧt/ scrounged /skraʊnʤd/ scrunched /skrʌnʧt/ stretched /strɛʧt/ straights /streɪts/… Read more Lexico

The Antimoon Method

Moon

According to the Antimoon website: typical English classes are not an effective way to learn English. They produce very slow progress, espe­cially after you reach the interme­diate level. Most learners, after years of attending classes, cannot speak English without making a lot of mistakes in grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. Instead, the Antimoon Method requires “massive… Read more The Antimoon Method

New Statesman, and other magazines

New Statesman web page

The New Statesman is, in its own words, “the leading progressive political and cultural magazine in the United Kingdom.” It has been published since 1913. Unless you subscribe, there is only limited access to the website, but you can read the magazine via EBSCOhost. Other British political magazines include: The Economist, which can also be… Read more New Statesman, and other magazines

Five ways to get better at a new language

Sleeping dog

From an article in the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest. Listen to the language Don’t try too hard with the grammar Choose the right time of day to learn Take long breaks Drink a little alcohol The article includes links to the supporting research, some of which might be rigorous. There is also a podcast,… Read more Five ways to get better at a new language

OED Word of the Day

Dictionary page

The Oxford English Dictionary picks a word each day. They tend to be “hard” or unusual words. Recent picks include: bricoleur – a person who performs a variety of manual jobs; someone who fixes things in an ingenious manner grandiloquent – characterized by a high-flown, extravagant, or bombastic style or manner, esp. in language Nowheresville… Read more OED Word of the Day

PsychCrunch

PsychCrunch logo

PsychCrunch is a series of podcasts from the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest. For example, one episode is How to be Funnier: Can psychology help us to be funnier? Our presenter Ginny Smith hears how a key ingredient of humour is “incongruity” and the surprise of unexpected meanings. Individual words too can be amusing, but actually most… Read more PsychCrunch

SciDev.Net

Web page

SciDev.Net carries news and analysis about science and technology for global development. It has a section of Practical guides, such as: How to advance your career in science How to give a science flash talk How to question numbers How to write about your science

Eastminster

Eastminster front page

UEA’s School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies has a politics blog called Eastminster. While it appears to be written entirely by two people called Editor and Admin, closer inspection reveals the actual authors. Some examples of posts: Seven Myths Used To Make The Case For A Second Referendum Terrorist obituaries: some early research… Read more Eastminster

Why spelling is hard – but also hard to change

Lingthusiasm header image

In Lingthusiasm Episode 33 Lauren Gawne and Gretchen McCulloch discuss spelling. Gretchen: I think of spelling systems across languages as kind of like living in a house. When you first move into a house, you unpack everything and you hopefully say, “Okay. I’m gonna be organised this time.” And you say, “This is where everything’s… Read more Why spelling is hard – but also hard to change

Oxford Academic videos

Oxford University Press has a YouTube channel, Oxford Academic, with videos on many topics. For example, there are some Very Short Introductions to human evolution, behavioural economics, fungi, William Shakespeare, Iran, Buddhism, neoliberalism, etc. Here is Professor Jones of Norwich Business School on branding:

Because Internet

Book cover

Because Internet : Understanding the New Rules of Language, by linguist Gretchen McCulloch, is a guide to the way internet language is evolving. She explains how your first social internet experience influences whether you prefer “LOL” or “lol,” why ~sparkly tildes~ succeeded where centuries of proposals for irony punctuation had failed, what emoji have in… Read more Because Internet

LSESU Economics Society essay competition

Society logo

The London School of Economics Students’ Union Economics Society has an essay competition. Entry is open to students in their final two years of secondary school, or in sixth form college (including students taking A-Level, the International Baccalaureate, or any other equivalent curriculum). Entrants do not have to be studying at schools within the UK… Read more LSESU Economics Society essay competition

The Scientist’s Guide to Writing

Book cover

Stephen B. Heard, whose blog Scientist Sees Squirrel we mentioned last week, is a biologist at the University of New Brunswick in Canada. He has written a book, The scientist’s guide to writing (Princeton University Press, 2016). In the preface he says, “This book is designed for students and early-career scientists across the natural sciences… Read more The Scientist’s Guide to Writing

Why do we make statistics so hard for our students?

Welch’s t-test

From Stephen B. Heard’s blog Scientist Sees Squirrel: If you’re like me, you’re continually frustrated by the fact that undergraduate students struggle to understand statistics. Actually, that’s putting it mildly: a large fraction of undergraduates simply refuse to understand statistics; mention a requirement for statistical data analysis in your course and you’ll get eye-rolling, groans,… Read more Why do we make statistics so hard for our students?

SPSS ebooks

SPSS screenshot

As many of our students know, SPSS is a computer program (aka software application) used for statistical analysis. UEA Library has several ebooks about SPSS, including: SPSS for Dummies by Arthur Griffith SPSS for Starters by Ton J. Cleophas and Aeilko H. Zwinderman SPSS Survival Manual by Julie Pallant INTO Resource Centre has a print… Read more SPSS ebooks

HSTalks again

Tesco talk

HSTalks are video lectures and case studies. UEA has access to the Business & Management Collection, which consists of 1,222 talks, 53 of which have been published so far this year. The lectures are accompanied by slides. Some have transcripts and subtitles, while some include questions. For example: Tesco: how supply chain strategy supports retail… Read more HSTalks again

Economics games

The Economics Network has some games for economics classes. For example: The International Trade Game CARTEL: a board game for teaching game theory Tennis Balls in Economics The Production Possibility Frontier Game These are not computer games, but require pencils and paper, scissors, tennis balls, etc.

ielts-simon.com

IELTS Simon

ielts-simon.com is a blog of daily tips on the IELTS test. For example, from a recent post, IELTS Speaking: slow down!: While you may be marked down by the examiner if you hesitate too often, there’s nothing wrong with speaking a bit more slowly and carefully. You can post comments and questions.

Lingthusiasm

Lingthusiasm header image

Lingthusiasm is: A podcast that’s enthusiastic about linguistics! Make your boring commute or chores feel like a lively, nerdy, language-y dinner party with real linguists! Gretchen McCulloch (All Things Linguistic) and Lauren Gawne (Superlinguo) bring you into fascinating and hilarious half-hour conversations about the patterns behind language which you never realized you were already saying.… Read more Lingthusiasm

Business documentaries on Netflix

Dirty Money collage

Among the films and TV programmes on Netflix are some business documentaries. These ones are currently available in the UK: Dirty Money (series): corporate corruption from Volkwagen to Trump Explained (series, mostly non-business): episodes on the stock market, cryptocurrency, racial wealth gap Drugs Inc. (series): supply train of the illicit drugs trade Betting on Zero:… Read more Business documentaries on Netflix

Learn English with Cambridge

Learn English with Cambridge is a new YouTube channel, with videos presented by five youngish teachers. The videos so far: 3 phrasal verbs to express excitement in English American vs. British English vocabulary differences Asking for and giving directions in English Common travel expressions in English Common mistakes with modal verbs in English Dietary requirements… Read more Learn English with Cambridge

The Question Box

ELT Journal table of contents, 1946

The ELT Journal has been published since 1946. Until 1981 it had a section called The Question Box, which answered readers’ questions. Three examples from the earliest issues: Question: I have recently come across fry-pan for frying-pan. Is this form considered correct? Answer: Fry-pan is not accepted as standard English and is considered incorrect by… Read more The Question Box

Usage tips

Typo

Did you know that “winter denotes a season of the year, but connotes cold weather”? If not, then perhaps you should consult the Usage section of the Oxford Dictionaries website. It has numerous tips on word choices. For example: Bring or take? Continual or continuous? Its or it’s? Phenomenon or phenomena? Who or whom? Other… Read more Usage tips

Easy and difficult languages

Language world map

The United States Foreign Services Institute groups languages into four categories, according to the average time required for an English-speaking learner to become proficient in them. For example: 24 weeks: Danish, Dutch, French, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, Swedish 36 weeks: German, Haitian Creole, Indonesian, Malay, Swahili 44 weeks: Albanian, Bengali, Burmese, Czech, Farsi, Finnish,… Read more Easy and difficult languages

Chinese students and English names

A red rose

Many Chinese students adopt English names while studying in English-speaking countries. This article in Language, Culture and Curriculum explores why. For example, when asked “Why do you use an English name?” (multiple responses allowed), students answered as follows: English names are easier for teachers to remember: 71% English names are easier for teachers to pronounce:… Read more Chinese students and English names

#UnscienceAnAnimal

Scalloped hammerhead shark

A few months ago Twitter had a game with the hashtag #UnscienceAnAnimal. The idea was to compose funny labels for the anatomies of various animals. such as the scalloped hammerhead shark (pictured). Examples of labels are wiggly bits, scary part, booper, floof, squirt hole and so on. Source: American Scientist